Information Literacy Mission Statement

To provide Nyack College community with the skills and knowledge needed to effectively locate, evaluate, and use information to promote life-long learning for service to Christ and society.*

Nyack College Information Literacy Definition

Information literacy is an intellectual framework for identifying, finding, understanding, evaluating and using information. It includes determining the nature and extent of needed information; accessing information effectively and efficiently; evaluating the quality and source of the information; interpreting and integrating selected information in the learner’s knowledge base, value system and Christian worldview; managing and organizing information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose, demonstrating creative ability in applying, designing, inventing or authoring new information; understanding the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use of information and information technology; and observing laws, regulations, and institutional policies related to the access and use of information.*

*Approved by Nyack Faculty Spring 2003

Alliance Theological Seminary

Master of Divinity
Master of Arts in Biblical Literature
Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies
Master of Professional Studies
Doctorate in Ministry

Identify best practices in theological reflection, social analysis, and multicultural and cross-cultural aspects of communication.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading church, para-church, and faith-based practitioners and researchers in the areas of community life and development.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization affect church theology and practice.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as primary sources, original languages, social analysis, and demographics.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

College of Bible and Christian Ministry

Biblical and Theological Studies:

Understand current and historical approaches to biblical interpretation and theological reflection.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading researchers in the areas of Old Testament, New Testament, Systematic Theology, Historical Theology, and Biblical Languages.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization affect biblical interpretation.

Competently use standard research methodologies, such as analyzing biblical texts in their original languages and in their geographical and historical contexts with the aid of secondary sources; analyzing the writings of leading theologians in their religious contexts, with the aide of secondary sources.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Cross Cultural Studies and Missiology:

Identify best practices in theological reflection, social analysis, and multicultural and cross-cultural aspects of communication.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading church, para-church, and faith-based practitioners and researchers in the areas of mission mobilization, church based cross-cultural ministry, indigenous church movements, and community development.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization affect the work of the global church movement.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as primary sources, original languages, social analysis, and demographics.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Pastoral Ministry:

Identify best practices in theological reflection, social analysis, and multicultural and cross-cultural aspects of communication.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading church, para-church, and faith-based practitioners and researchers in the areas of community life and development.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization affect church theology and practice.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as primary sources, original languages, social analysis, and demographics.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Youth Ministry and Christian Education:

Identify best practices in theological reflection, social analysis, and multicultural and cross-cultural aspects of youth ministry.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading church, para-church, and faith-based youth ministry practitioners and researchers in the areas of community life and youth ministry development.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization effect the practice of youth ministry.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as primary sources, social analysis, and demographics.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources
and ideas.

College of Arts & Sciences: Division of Humanities

Communications:

Understand and analyze the ethical, social and multicultural aspects of communication within a variety of media.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions in the area of communication theory.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization affect communication theory and practice.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as comparative analysis to determine appropriate media in light of audience and content of message.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

English:

Understand current and historical approaches to literary criticism and recognize leading literary critics.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic resources examining various genres from a biographical, social, historical, cultural, and theological perspective.

Understand the effects of the social, economic, political, religious, and cultural influences on written expression.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as interpreting and analyizing primary sources in light of secondary sources.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

History:

Understand various approaches to historical thought and the implications of each approach.

Competently use standard history research methodologies such as compiling and analyzing data from various secondary sources.

Understand the implications of the social, economic, political, religious, and cultural aspects of a global community.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading historians in specific historical eras.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Philosophy:

Understand and identify the basic schools of thought within the discipline as well as the principle figures within those schools.

Identify, locate, and articulate significant print and electronic indexes and other sources of research regarding the discipline of philosophy.

Competently reason, and cogently and persuasively argue in ways that reveal the students understanding of the long history of philosophy and the key figures within that history.

Comprehend how respective schools of philosophy reflect specific cultural, historical, and even economic conditions.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Religion:

Understand, analyze and evaluate the various methodologies currently used in the field of comparative religious studies

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading scholars and researchers in the filed of comparative religious studies.

Comprehend how globalization and world-wide urbanization are affecting the evolution and development of traditional religions as well as the ways in which these trends are spawning the development of new religious systems and ideas.

Competently use standard history research methodologies such as compiling and analyzing data from various secondary sources.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

College of Arts & Sciences: Division of Mathematics and Sciences 

Mathematics:

Understand various approaches to mathematical thought and implications of each approach.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading mathematicians in specific eras.

Competently use standard mathematics research methodologies such as compiling and analyzing data from various secondary sources.

Comprehend how mathematical concepts and methods were introduced and developed.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

College of Arts & Sciences: Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Psychology:

Understand, analyze and evaluate best principles in current theory and practice including the ability to critically assess the intersection of spirituality and science within the province of psychology.

Identify, locate, and make use of research methodologies such as experiments, case studies, survey methods, and electronic sources of research within the discipline of psychology.

Competently reason and soundly argue in ways that exhibit understanding of both quantitative and qualitative research within the field of psychology.

Comprehend the implications of social, cultural, political and religious diversity for constructing a wholistic psychological approach to persons.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Sociology:

Understand, analyze, and evaluate principles of sociological inquiry and develop the ability to critically assess empirical research in sociology.

Comprehend how globalization and rapid urbanization transform many patterns of social life.

Identify, locate and articulate print and electronic research contributions of early social thinkers and contemporary sociologists.

Competently use sociological research methods such as experiments, surveys, and participant observation.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Social Work:

Identify “best practices in current social work research and practice.

Competently use research methodologies such as case studies, survey methods and program evaluations.

Comprehend how national, political, social and economic trends, poverty, human rights, and immigration affect social work practice.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in social work and social work research.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Master of Arts in Counseling/MFT:

Identify “best practices” for integrating the counseling profession with the Christian faith.

Competently use standard social research methodologies such as case studies, experiments, questionnaires, interviews, etc.

Comprehend how cultures, ethnicities and the urban environment affect counseling methodologies.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the appropriate fields of counseling.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

School of Business and Leadership

Accounting:

Regularly read the national and business press as well as accounting and tax journals, to remain current on financial news, trends, innovations and developments.

Competently utilize search engines and websites to obtain research regarding current accounting and taxation issues.

Comprehend how globalization impacts the accounting profession’s trending toward worldwide standardization of accounting principles.

Develop a personal research approach to obtaining information from print and electronic sources as aids in solving classroom-assigned and real-life problems.

Understand the importance of and comply with the ethical and legal standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Business Administration:

Regularly read the business press to remain current on business news, trends, innovations, and developments

Quickly gather relevant information from the Web in order to facilitate financial, marketing, and business strategy decision making

Use print resources, indexes, search engines, and electronic databases to find the latest news, developments, and research contributions (both recent and historic) in economic and managerial thought

Develop appropriate research strategies to complete financial, marketing and business strategy projects, both assigned and self-initiated

Understand the importance of and comply with the ethical and legal standards of fair use of resources and ideas

Organizational Management:

Understand basic managerial theories and the applications of these theories in practical settings.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research in the areas of social science and management.

Understand the nature of a worldview and the function of faith and reason in developing a worldview.

Competently use standard social science research methodologies such as compiling and analyzing data from primary and secondary sources.
Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Master of Business Administration:

Identify “best practices” in current business and managerial thought and understand ethical implications of various courses of action.

Competently use standard business research methodologies such as case studies, survey instruments, quantitative analysis etc.

Comprehend how national and international events affect local businesses.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the appropriate areas of business and management.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Master of Science in Organization Leadership:

Identify “best practices” in current leadership behavior with particular emphasis on servant leadership.

Competently use standard social science research methodologies such as case studies, questionnaires, interviews, and so forth , which meet APA publication guidelines , to address leadership and organizational issues.

Comprehend how self-reflective awareness of leadership development needs and the development of an action plan to strengthen leadership skills, alongside knowledge of major leadership scholars, theories and research studies impact organizational leadership and development. Identify a clear values based philosophical framework for giving a leadership voice.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the appropriate areas of organizational leadership.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

School of Education

Adolescent Education:

Identify, understand and articulate “best practices” and current issues in the field
of adolescent education and their implications for research and practice.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the field of adolescent education.

Use the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Style guidelines to analyze the parts of scholarly articles, organize and design research, and publish papers.

Effectively use the Worldwide Web as an instructional resource for planning,
instruction and assessment.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of
resources and ideas.

Childhood/Early Childhood Education:

Identify, understand and articulate “best practices” and current issues in the field
of early childhood and childhood education and their implications for research and practice.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the field of early childhood and childhood education.

Use the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Style guidelines to analyze the parts of scholarly articles, organize and design research, and publish papers.

Effectively use the Worldwide Web as an instructional resource for planning,
instruction and assessment.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

TESOL:

Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary best practice in second language acquisition and language teaching by competent use of standard research methods in research writing.

Satisfactorily critique scholarly journal articles that focus on a topic related to second language acquisition and contemporary language teaching methods.

Recognize the value of writing as a resource for learning, for communication, and for critical thinking.

Competently use qualitative research methodology by interviewing an English as a second language person and writing a case study.

Masters in Education: (Childhood Education):

Identify, understand and articulate “best practices” and current issues in the field of childhood education and their implications for research and practice.

Identify, locate, analyze and evaluate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the field of Childhood Education.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as survey instruments, case studies, descriptive/historical research, meta-analyzes, etc.

Use the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Style guidelines to analyze the parts of scholarly articles, organize and design research, and publish papers.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Masters in Education: (Inclusion):

Identify “best practices” in current educational thought and, in particular, inclusive education.

Competently use standard educational research methodologies such as survey instruments, assessment tools, etc. and comply with all federal and state regulations relating to protection of human participants in research.

Comprehend how international, national, state and institutional teaching standards affect public and private schools.

Identify, locate and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in the appropriate areas of education and distinguish between peer and non-peer reviewed publications.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Masters in Education: (Special Education):

Identify “best practices” in special education and related fields.

Identify, locate, and articulate significant print and electronic research contributions of leading practitioners and researchers in special education and related fields.

Identify, understand, and articulate current issues in the field of special education and their implications for research and practice.

Competently use research methodologies such as case studies, survey methods, descriptive/historical research, meta-analyses, and traditional quantitative research methodologies.

Understand and comply with legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

School of Music

Music
Music Composition
Music Education
Music Performance
Sacred Music

Acquire knowledge of major composers, stylistic periods and major compositions from the Renaissance period to the present day.

Identify, locate, and articulate significant print and electronic resources related to musicology.

Understand how music is an expression within diverse world cultures and responds to political and social movements.

Competently use standard research methodologies such as comparative analysis of composers, musical works, and stylistic periods.

Understand and comply with the legal and ethical standards of fair use of resources and ideas.

Cheryl Phenicie School of Nursing

Competently analyze and apply principles of the nursing process.

Identify, locate and utilize significant print and electronic research related to evidence-based nursing.

Competently use quantitative and qualitative research methodologies such as case studies and interviews.

Modify nursing care plans in light of local and global issues.

Understand and comply with legal and ethical standards for fair use of resources and ideas.

 

Updated March, 2011

Standard One

The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed.

Performance Indicators:
1. The information literate student defines and articulates the need for information.

Outcomes Include:

a. Confers with instructors and participates in class discussions, peer workgroups, and electronic discussions to identify a research topic, or other information need
b. Develops a thesis statement and formulates questions based on the information need
c. Explores general information sources to increase familiarity with the topic
d. Defines or modifies the information need to achieve a manageable focus
e. Identifies key concepts and terms that describe the information need
f.  Recognizes that existing information can be combined with original thought, experimentation, and/or analysis to produce new information

2. The information literate student identifies a variety of types and formats of potential sources for information.

Outcomes Include:
a. Knows how information is formally and informally produced, organized, and disseminated
b. Recognizes that knowledge can be organized into disciplines that influence the way information is accessed
c. Identifies the value and differences of potential resources in a variety of formats (e.g., multimedia, database, website, data set, audio/visual, book)
d. Identifies the purpose and audience of potential resources (e.g., popular vs. scholarly, current vs historical)
e. Differentiates between primary and secondary sources, recognizing how their use and importance vary with each discipline
f.  Realizes that information may need to be constructed with raw data from primary sources
3. The information literate student considers the costs and benefits of acquiring the needed information.

Outcomes Include:
a. Determines the availability of needed information and makes decisions on broadening the information seeking process beyond local resources (e.g., interlibrary loan; using resources at other locations; obtaining images, videos, text, or sound)
b. Considers the feasibility of acquiring a new language or skill (e.g., foreign or discipline-based) in order to gather needed information and to understand its context
c. Defines a realistic overall plan and timeline to acquire the needed information
4. The information literate student reevaluates the nature and extent of the information need.

Outcomes Include:
a.  Reviews the initial information need to clarify, revise, or refine the question
b.  Describes criteria used to make information decisions and choices

Standard Two

The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently.

Performance Indicators:

1. The information literate student selects the most appropriate investigative methods or information retrieval systems for accessing the needed information.

Outcomes Include:
a. Identifies appropriate investigative methods (e.g., laboratory experiment, simulation, fieldwork)
b. Investigates benefits and applicability of various investigative methods
c. Investigates the scope, content, and organization of information retrieval systems
d. Selects efficient and effective approaches for accessing the information needed from the investigative method or information retrieval system.
2. The information literate student constructs and implements effectively-designed search strategies.

Outcomes Include:
a. Develops a research plan appropriate to the investigative method
b. Identifies keywords, synonyms and related terms for the information needed
c. Selects controlled vocabulary specific to the discipline or information retrieval source
d. Constructs a search strategy using appropriate commands for the information retrieval system selected (e.g., Boolean operators, truncation, and proximity for search engines; internal organizers such as indexes for books)
e. Implements the search strategy in various information retrieval systems using different user interfaces and search engines, with different command languages, protocols, and search parameters
f. Implements the search using investigative protocols appropriate to the discipline
3. The information literate student retrieves information online or in person using a variety of methods.

Outcomes Include:
a. Uses various search systems to retrieve information in a variety of formats
b. Uses various classification schemes and other systems (e.g., call number systems or indexes) to locate information resources within the library or to identify specific sites for physical exploration
c. Uses specialized online or in person services available at the institution to retrieve information needed (e.g., interlibrary loan delivery, professional associations, institutional research offices, community resources, experts and practitioners)
d. Uses surveys, letters, interviews, and other forms of inquiry to retrieve primary information
4. The information literate student refines the search strategy if necessary.

Outcomes Include:
a. Assesses the quantity, quality and relevance of the search results to determine whether alternative information retrieval systems or investigative methods should be utilized
b. Identifies gaps in the information retrieved and determines if the search strategy should be revised
c. Repeats the search using the revised strategy as necessary
5. The information literate student extracts, records, and manages the information and its sources.

Outcomes Include:
a. Selects among various technologies the most appropriate one for the task of extracting the needed information (e.g., copy/paste software functions, photocopier, scanner, audio/visual equipment, or exploratory instruments)
b. Creates a system for organizing the information
c. Differentiates between the types of sources cited and understands the elements and correct syntax of a citation for a wide range of resources
d. Records all pertinent citation information for future reference
e. Uses various technologies to manage the information selected and organized

Standard Three

The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.

Performance Indicators:

1. The information literate student summarizes the main ideas to be extracted from the information gathered.

Outcomes Include:
a. Reads the text and selects main ideas
b. Restates textual concepts in his/her own words and selects data accurately
c. Identifies verbatim material that can be then appropriately quoted
2. The information literate student articulates and applies initial criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources.

Outcomes Include:
a. Examines and compares information from various sources in order to evaluate reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, and point of view or bias
b. Analyzes the structure and logic of supporting arguments or methods
c. Recognizes prejudice, deception, or manipulation
d. Recognizes the cultural, physical, or other context within which the information was created and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information
3. The information literate student synthesizes main ideas to construct new concepts.

Outcomes Include:
a. Recognizes interrelationships among concepts and combines them into potentially useful primary statements with supporting evidence
b. Extends initial synthesis, when possible, at a higher level of abstraction to construct new hypotheses that may require additional information
c. Utilizes computer and other technologies (e.g., spreadsheets, databases, multimedia, and audio or visual equipment) for studying the interaction of ideas and other phenomena
4. The information literate student compares new knowledge with prior knowledge to determine the value added, contradictions, or other unique characteristics of the information.

Outcomes Include:
a. Determines whether information satisfies the research or other information need.
b. Uses consciously selected criteria to determine whether the information contradicts or verifies information used from other sources
c. Draws conclusions based upon information gathered
d. Tests theories with discipline-appropriate techniques (e.g., simulators, experiments)
e. Determines probably accuracy by questioning the source of the data, the limitations of the information gathering tools or strategies, and the reasonableness of the conclusions
f. Integrates new information that provides evidence for the topic
5. The information literate student determines whether the new knowledge has an impact on the individual’s value system and takes steps to reconcile differences.

Outcomes Include:
a. Investigates differing viewpoints encountered in the literature
b. Determines whether to incorporate or reject viewpoints encountered
6. The information literate student validates understanding and interpretation of the information through discourse with other individuals, subject-area experts, and/or practitioners.

Outcomes Include:
a. Participates in classroom and other discussions
b. Participates in class-sponsored electronic communication forums designed to encourage discourse on the topic (e.g., email, bulletin boards, chat rooms)
c. Seeks expert opinion through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., interviews, email, listservs)
7. The information literate student determines whether the initial query should be revised.

Outcomes Include:
a .Determines if original information need has been satisfied or if additional information is needed
b. Reviews search strategy and incorporates additional concepts as necessary
c. Reviews information retrieval sources used and expands to include others as needed

Standard Four

The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.

Performance Indicators:

1. The information literate student applies new and prior information to the planning and creation of a particular product or performance.

Outcomes Include:
a. Organizes the content in a manner that supports the purposes and format of the product or performance (e.g., outlines, drafts, storyboards)
b. Articulates knowledge and skills transferred from prior experiences to planning and creating the product or performance
c. Integrates the new and prior information, including quotations and paraphrasings, in a manner that supports the purposes of the product or performance
d. Manipulates digital text, images, and data, as needed, transferring them from their original locations and formats to a new context
2. The information literate student revises the development process for the product or performance.

Outcomes Include:
a. Maintains a journal or log of activities related to the information seeking, evaluating and communicating process
b. Reflects on pass successes, failures and alternative strategies
3. The information literate student communicates the product or performance effectively to others.

Outcomes Include:
a. Chooses a communication medium and format that best supports the purposes of the product or performance and the intended audience
b. Uses a range of information technology applications in creating the product or performance
c. Incorporates principles of design and communication
d. Communicates clearly and with a style that supports the purposes of the intended audience

Standard Five

The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally.

Performance Indicators:

1. The information literate student understands many of the ethical, legal and socio-economic issues surrounding information and information technology.

Outcomes Include:
a. Identifies and discusses issues related to privacy and security in both the print and electronic environments
b. Identifies and discusses issues related to censorship and freedom of speech
c. Demonstrates an understanding of intellectual property, copyright, and fair use of copyrighted material
2. The information student follows laws, regulations, institutional policies, and etiquette related to the access and use of information resources.

Outcomes Include:
a. Participates in electronic discussions following accepted practices (e.g. “Netiquette”)
b. Uses approved passwords and other forms of ID for access to information resources
c. Complies with institutional policies on access to information resources
d. Preserves the integrity of information resources, equipment, systems and facilities
e. Legally obtains, stores, and disseminates text, data, images, or sounds
f. Demonstrates an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and does not represent work attributable to others as his/her own
g. Demonstrates an understanding of institutional policies related to human subjects research
3. The information literate student acknowledges the use of information sources in communicating the product or performance.

Outcomes Include:
a. Selects an appropriate documentation style and uses it consistently to cite sources
b. Posts permission granted notices, as needed, for copyrighted material

Approved by:  ACRL Board, January 18, 2000

Information Literacy Student Learning Goal

1.   Please identify one of the following Information Literacy Standards (taken from ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education) that is appropriate for each course you teach.

1. The Information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed.

2. The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently.

3. The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.

4. The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.

5. The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally.

2.   Once you have chosen the most relevant information literacy standard, please refer to the list of standards, performance indicators, and outcomes.

3.   Locate the standard you have chosen for a specific course and review the corresponding performance indicators and outcomes.

4.   Choose at least one performance indicator and one or more associated outcome(s) related to the performance indicator chosen.

5.   The specific outcome(s) will be listed as one of your Student Learning Goals on your syllabus and will be assessed at the end of the course.

6.   You may choose to use the “Information Literacy Outcome” wording for your Information Literacy Student Learning Goal on your syllabus, OR you may use a Student Learning Goal that you have expressed in your own words but one that fits the criteria of the standard, performance indicator, and outcome you have chosen from the standards.

7.   Include the standard number, performance indicator number and outcome letter in parentheses after the Information Literacy Student Learning Goal (this will identify which student learning goal is an information literacy goal).

Here are two examples of how an Information Literacy Student Learning Goal will appear on a syllabus.  The first uses the wording of a specific IL “outcome” and the second uses a professor’s wording.

 Example #1:  Wording taken from the “Outcome” on the Standards: (for Psychology and Sociology of Religion)

Assignment: 8-10 page critical analysis of one of the books listed below:

  • Summary of Contents – 2 pages maximum (to facilitate the student’s ability to synthesize large amounts of reading material)
  • Analysis of Contents – 4-5 pages (to facilitate the student’s ability to read critically, filtering each idea through a Biblical “grid” and evaluate ideas as to their Scriptural viability and cultural practicality)
  • Application – 1-2 pages (to facilitate the student’s ability to implement new ideas and to transform his/her thought patterns and lifestyle)

Choosing Appropriate Information Literacy Standard, Performance Indicators, and Outcomes:

  • Standard #3: “The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.”
  • Performance Indicator #2: “The information literate student articulates and applies initial criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources.”
  • Outcome d: “Recognizes the cultural, physical, or other context within which the information was created and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information”.

On the syllabus:

Student Learning Goal:

Recognizes the cultural, physical, or other context within which the information was created and understands the impact of context on interpreting the information. (IL Standard 3, 2d)

Example #2:  Wording by professor but corresponds to following standard, performance indicator and outcome: (for Greek course)

On the syllabus:

Student Learning Goal:

Understand Greek grammar and apply it to achieve accurate translations (IL Standard 4, 1a)

Choosing Corresponding Information Literacy Standard, Performance Indicator, and Outcome:

  • Standard #4: “The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose”.
  • Performance Indicator 1:  “The information literate student applies new and prior information to the planning and creation of a particular product or performance”.
  • Outcome a:  “Organizes the content in a manner that supports the purposes and format of the product or performance.”

Information Literacy Rubrics:  Simple |  Detailed