Dr. Poston reviews book on Death, Resurrection and Human Destiny

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Wednesday September 2, 2015

Dr. Larry Poston, Professor of Religion, publishes a Book Review on Death, Resurrection and Human Destiny: Christian and Muslim Perspectives by David Marshall and Lucinda Mosher (eds.) in Missiology: An International Review.

For more information: http://mis.sagepub.com/content/current

Dr. Poston reviews book on Death, Resurrection and Human Destiny

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Wednesday September 2, 2015

Dr. Larry Poston, Professor of Religion, publishes a Book Review on Death, Resurrection and Human Destiny: Christian and Muslim Perspectives by David Marshall and Lucinda Mosher (eds.) in Missiology: An International Review.

For more information: http://mis.sagepub.com/content/current

Dr. Lee researches Math Programs in South Korea and North Korea

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Monday August 31, 2015

Dr. JungHang Lee, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, recently conducted research at the Seoul International Christian Academy (SICA), in Korea. He worked with Dr. KyongWon Lee (Principal) and Ms. Lauren Kim (Teacher in Mathematics) to develop teacher education programs.  He is also working with SICA to develop pre-service teacher internship program.

What new thing did you learn in your research?

“The main topic was math manipulatives and knowledge transfer in mathematics classrooms. While there are studies on the pros and cons of using math manipulatives, there are few researches on the effects of using manipulatives on math knowledge transfer. This research examines whether concrete and realistic math manipulatives facilitate knowledge transfer, the ability to apply learned knowledge to new or different situations more than abstract symbols do.”

Dr. Lee interviewed North Korean mathematics teachers for his research, as well as being interviewed by the Institute of Science Education for the Gifted and Talented in Yonsei University.

“I interviewed 3 North Korean mathematics teachers who taught in a secondary school in North Korea. Each session lasted approximately 3 hours, which I am converting into scripts. In addition to discussing their social, educational and family backgrounds, I also explored their pedagogical perspectives. During my interview, I was asked questiions about the mathematics education in U.S. schools, as well as, to describe what it means to be “good” in mathematics."

The Institute of Science Education for the Gifted and Talented in Yonsei University is a government funded institution which focuses on Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Earth Science. These gifted students are selected from elementary and middle schools and are taught by professors from Yonsei University.  

In addition to his research, Dr. Lee serves as an advisor for the Korean Student Association at Nyack College. He earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Columbia University, M.A. from Columbia University, M.S.in Applied Mathematics  from Rutgers University, and B.S. double major in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics  from University of Technology, Sydney. 

Dr. Lee received the 2013 Arts and Science Emerging Scholar of the Year.

For more information on these programs:

http://www.sicacademy.org/       http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/gifted/

The Loss of AGSC Colleague, Dr. James Chin

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Friday August 28, 2015

The Loss of AGSC Colleague, Dr. James Chin

http://www.nyack.edu/blog/NyackNews/2216

Dr. Yu awarded Yale Research Fellowship

Posted by Fernando.Arzola on Wednesday August 12, 2015

Dr. K. Kale Yu, Assistant Professor of History, received Yale Divinity School's The David M. Stowe Fund for Mission Research for 2015. This research fellowship supports visiting scholars in their missions-related research at Yale Divinity Library

http://web.library.yale.edu/divinity/david-m-stowe-fund-mission-research

Dr. Yu’s project considers the relationship between the work of women missionaries affiliated with the Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society (WFMS) and nation-building in late nineteenth and early twentieth century, especially as revealed in their focus on collective transformation of Korean society and whose narratives define the Christian identity in gender roles and construction.”

What have to discovered so far?

"The more research, the more the complex the narrative becomes. You go in thinking one way but you uncover additional factors and people at work in the formation of historical developments. For example, as WFMS missionaries critically engaged conventional representations of gender in Korean society, they resisted dominant cultural discourses and attempted to negotiate a vision of a new Christian woman that would become the cornerstone of Korean society and nation.”

What developed your interest in the historical study of missions? 

"The inter-cultural contact and communication which is central to missions fascinates me. Over and over again in the study of missions, what we often think is being communicated is interpreted through the native peoples' own understanding and culture."

Dr. Yu completed his Ph.D. from Columbia University, M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary, and B.A. from Clark University. He also received the 2015 Arts & Sciences Special recognition for his scholarship during the 2014-2015 academic year.

To see the 2015 Stowe Fellows:

http://web.library.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Stowe_Fund_recipients_2015.pdf