Breakout Session Schedule


 

(Held at Alliance Theological Seminary, a short walk from Nyack High School Auditorium)

1:15-2:25
Room  Chapel (200)

Enhance Student Engagement - SUNY’s Tools of Engagement Project (TOEP)

The TOEP project provides a variety of open educational resources carefully selected for their impact on student engagement.  Materials are organized into several categories including Lifelong Learning, Collaborative Spaces, Presentations, Photo Sharing, Productivity Tools, Mobile Apps, Video and more.   Discovery Activities are provided and official recognition can be earned.  Rockland Community College participated in TOEP for the first time this year. In this presentation, we will explain the Project and share some of the resources we have found to be effective.

Lynn Aaron, Rockland Community College Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning Co-Director and Computer Studies faculty

Catherine Davis, Rockland Community College English as a Second Language Department Chair

Talia Lipton, Rockland Community College Speech Department faculty

Eileen MacAvery Kane, Rockland Community College Art Department faculty

Room 370 (70)

Title:  Engaging students in a collaborative metacognitive process that evaluates learning approaches before and during learning tasks to enhance academic success.

A vast majority undergraduate students are not independent, self-regulated learners  and it becomes critical to initiate metacognitive processes in students early in their undergraduate careers. In this workshop, we will demonstrate our approach to address this problem by engaging participants in active learning exercises, that will be flanked by tools we have developed to trigger and enhance the development of students’ metacognitive skills.  A repository of such learning approaches will be built during the workshop through peer-learning (such as think pair share) and discussions. This way, the participants will gain both the awareness and the tools needed to help their students adapt to learning in the college/university classroom

 Marcy Kelly, PhD,  is a Professor and the Assistant Chair in the Department of Biology at Pace University.  

 Zafir Buraei , Ph.D..  is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Pace University. He earned his PhD in Neurophysiology at Tulane University, 2006, and completed his postdoctoral studies in Neuroscience at Columbia University in 2012. 

Room 150  (25)  (repeated at 2:15)

Taking your Pulse: Assessment Rubrics to Evaluate Progress Towards Student-Centered Pedagogy

Evidence-based research has demonstrated that a student-centered instructional model is more effective in promoting learning gains and thus, there has been a gradual paradigm shift in teaching pedagogy to one in which students play a more active role in learning. In 2012, the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE) was created by the National Science Foundation.

The mission of PULSE is to catalyze departmental transformation leading to inclusive, student-centered, evidence-based teaching and learning to improve teaching effectiveness and cultivate the development of students prepared for the challenges of the 21st century.

Brancaccio-Taras, Ph.D.  is Chairperson of the Department of Biological Sciences at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) of the City University of New York

 Peteroy-Kelly, Ph.D. is  Professor and the Assistant Chair in the Department of Biology at Pace University

Jacqueline Washington, Ph.D. is Chair and Professor of the Department of Biology and Chemistry at Nyack College,

Room 160 (25)

Engaging Students to Optimize the Learning Environment

 The qualitative study, “Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty,” by Peter Felten, Allison Cook-Sather, and Catherine Bovill (Jossey-Bass, 2014) explores a range of methods used in the United States and Europe to improve teaching effectiveness via collaboration with students.  With support from research literature about outcomes for faculty and students, the study provides a strong premise that provides a theoretical foundation for Mercy College’s Pulse on Learning (PoL) initiative.  Faculty, faculty developers, and other academic affairs administrators will be interested in this adaptable process for their institutions.  The process may be used with new faculty, or faculty at all stages of their careers, so that they have the benefit of students’ perspectives and experiences of the learning environment.

Victoria Mondelli, Ph.D. oversees faculty development, tutoring, and other instructional initiatives at Mercy College.  As Executive Director of the Office for Teaching Excellence and Engaged Learning, Dr. Mondelli raises awareness for best practices across the curriculum and in the disciplines.

Room 311 (15)

Learning Styles…Getting From Theory to Pedagogical Practice

Most professors like to teach in the same way they like to learn.  This is great for the minority of students who share the same learning style as their instructor, but not so great for the majority of students who do not.  Does one need a Ph.D.  to grasp and operationalize a pedagogy that is learning style inclusive?  No.

There are many different frameworks and assessments for learning understanding learning styles.   After a brief overview of what’s out there, participants will take the assessment offered by Lefever.   We will compare notes, and then see examples of how lesson plans can be crafted that hit all four learning styles.    Your facilitator in this session does not do ANYTHING in the classroom longer than 15 minutes, and typically hits all four styles each hour.   Caution:  this session may be fun.

Len Kageler, Ph.D.  is Dean for the Center of Teaching Excellence and Faculty Resources, and Professor of Youth and Family Studies, Nyack College.

Room 302  (15)

Pack that Parachute!:  Supporting Teachers' Implementation of Active Learning in the K-12 Classroom.

Active Learning and its implementation in the classroom is no longer a novelty, it is now a necessity.  Teachers are now encouraged to organize educational activities which will allow students to have a greater role in their learning through intellectual engagement, critical thinking, and collaboration. Many K-12 educators though, need support in overcoming the attraction of Direct Instruction and its limitations, and to embrace student-centered pedagogy. This breakout session will share ideas and approaches which can be helpful to administrators and educators in supporting teachers who transition to Active Learning. Ideas and examples of implementation will also be covered.   In the 2nd breakout session the conversation will continue.

Dion T. Harrigan, Ph.D.  is Professor of Education at Nyack College School of Education. has taught in public and private schools in the US and elsewhere.  He also served as Chair of the Adolescence Education Department at Nyack College..

2:45-4:00
Room Chapel (200)

Title:  See the Writing on the Wall: Strategies for Designing and Using More Effective Classroom Spaces

Our interactive panel presentation will include three unique perspectives on designing Active Learning Classrooms (ALCs) and the teaching and learning that is possible in such spaces.  Beth Gordon, Executive Director of Academic Technology, will discuss the process of getting university buy-in to design and build ALCs and will also share Pace University’s current research results on this topic. Jane Collins, a professor of English, will demonstrate a teaching strategy she used in the ALC to engage students:  having students use their cellphones to vote on key issues, contribute anonymous ideas and offer feedback on their own learning experiences. Gerald Ardito, a professor of Education, will demonstrate strategies to implement collaborative writing in classes both between students and between students and teachers in both face to face and online settings.

Gerald Ardito  Ph.D,  is the Assistant Chair and Assistant Professor of STEM-D Education at Pace University's School of Education.

Jane Collins, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the English and Modern Language Studies Department at Pace University. She publishes poetry, literary criticism and articles on pedagogy.  

Beth Gordon, Ph.D. is the Executive Director for Academic Technology at Pace University, Director of ePortfolio and is also an adjunct instructor in English, Communications and Psychology. 

Room 370 (70)

The ABCs of Active Learning, Backward Design, and Classroom Assessment Techniques

Discover what assessment is and what it is not, why we need it, and the various means by which it can be conducted. Align learning objectives with learning activities and assessments and explore the backward design approach, which focuses on learning rather than teaching. Formative and summative assessment tools and strategies that engage students in an active learning environment will be discussed.

Catherine Roche, MA  is Division Chair, Business and Professional/Public Service and  Professor, of Business  at  SUNY Rockland.  She received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, in 2013.

Room 160 (25)

Active Learning, the Student Point of View

In this session four students reflect on their middle school/high school/ and college experiences when it comes to how they have been taught.   Their comments will related specifically to learning styles, and how they experience the typical and non- typical classroom session.   They will demonstrate, with participant help, some of teaching methods they find especially engaging.  Session participants will be free ask these students for their honest opinions about what they experience in the classroom.

Faith Argeroplos, session chair, senior Nyack College student as well as three others.

Room 150 (25)  (also offered at 1:15pm)

Taking your Pulse: Assessment Rubrics to Evaluate Progress Towards Student-Centered Pedagogy

Evidence-based research has demonstrated that a student-centered instructional model is more effective in promoting learning gains and thus, there has been a gradual paradigm shift in teaching pedagogy to one in which students play a more active role in learning. In 2012, the Partnership for Undergraduate Life Sciences Education (PULSE) was created by the National Science Foundation.

The mission of PULSE is to catalyze departmental transformation leading to inclusive, student-centered, evidence-based teaching and learning to improve teaching effectiveness and cultivate the development of students prepared for the challenges of the 21st century.

Brancaccio-Taras, Ph.D.  is Chairperson of the Department of Biological Sciences at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) of the City University of New York

 Peteroy-Kelly, Ph.D. is  Professor and the Assistant Chair in the Department of Biology at Pace University

Jacqueline Washington, Ph.D. is Chair and Professor of the Department of Biology and Chemistry at Nyack College

Room 311 (15)

Orientation meeting,  Graduate One Credit Course  EDG 660  “Current Topic, Teaching in the Age of Innovation”. 

This day is part of the course, the rest is on-line via Nyack.edu.   This credit counts toward a Masters Degree in Education.  The course also includes documented work applicable toward National Board of Professional Teaching Standards Certification.  All those who have pre-registered for the course via  www.nyack.edu/ETE need to a/content/ETEAttendttend this gathering. If you have not yet registered for EDG 660, you may do so Oct.  21.

Room 302 (15)

Continuation of Pack that Parachute!:  Supporting Teachers' Implementation of Active Learning in the K-12 Classroom.

Room TBA

Higher Ed Academic Leader Gathering, After Today, What?

In the run-up to this day several leaders have expressed the desire for some continuation of the collaboration and conversation.  Up to two representatives from each college/university may attend this session.